Burns schedule

Below is a small diagram with a brief description of a first, second and third degree burn. How to recognize them and what to do.

First degree burns

How to recognize:

  • This one is the least bad. The damage is superficial and usually does not leave scars.
  • The skin looks red, is painful and may be swollen.
  • Usually there are no blisters.

Therapy

  • Cool for at least ten minutes with lukewarm running water.
  • No further treatment is required.

 

Second degree burns

How to recognize:

  • The skin is damaged more deeply than with a first degree burn.
  • Blisters form.
  • The wound is red and painful.

Therapy

  • Cool for at least ten minutes.
  • Clothes that are stuck should not be pulled off, the clothes should be kept wet.
  • The burn and/or blisters must be covered.
  • If the blister is larger than a two euro coin, a doctor should look at it.
  • Try to leave blisters that are still intact.

 

Third degree burns

How to recognize:

  • There is even deeper damage to the skin than with a second-degree burn.
  • The burn has usually penetrated the tissues.
  • The skin is grayish white or black and feels leathery.
  • Because the nerve endings are burned, the wound is numb or slightly painful.
  • Permanent scars almost always occur.

Therapy

  • Take the victim to a doctor or hospital as quickly as possible, otherwise call an ambulance.
  • Here too, the wound must be covered (preferably with a metalline bandage) to limit expansion and contamination.
  • Leave clothes that are stuck. Put the bandage over it.
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